Information and communications technology


ISO/IEC 20016-1:2014 states the principles, rules and metadata elements for specifying language accessibility and Human Interface Equivalents (HIEs) in e-learning environments. It is structured to be able to support the requirements of applicable jurisdictional domains and in particular that of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.


ISO/IEC TR 19766:2007 provides recommendations relating to the design of icons to support accessibility by the elderly and people with disabilities. These recommendations assist accessible implementation of all icons for users. While these recommendations were developed to meet the needs of the elderly and people with disabilities, they can also provide greater accessibility to a wider range of users in a variety of different contexts.


ISO/IEC TR 13066:2012 provides an overview to the structure and terminology of the IAccessible2 accessibility API.
Source: ISO


ISO/IEC TR 13066-2:2012 provides information about the Microsoft® Windows® Automation Frameworks, including Microsoft Active Accessibility, User Interface (UI) Automation, and the common interfaces of these accessibility frameworks including the IAccessibleEx interface specification. It provides information on application programming interfaces (APIs) needed to use these frameworks.


Interoperability involves the ability to use assistive technology (AT) to add to or augment existing components of information technology (IT) systems. Interoperability between AT and IT is best facilitated via the use of standardized, public interfaces for all IT components.


Icons are used on Information and Communications Technology (ICT) products to facilitate interaction with their users. Icons can provide a language-independent means of communicating information to the user.


ISO/IEC 11581-10:2010 recognizes that icons are more than just symbols used on computer screens. Icons are interaction objects used by computer interfaces to accomplish various purposes. Icons can be rendered in various forms, including graphics, gesture, audio, tactile/haptics, or any combination thereof. This versatility in rendition can provide greater accessibility to their underlying functionalities.
Source: ISO


ISO/IEC 10779:2008 specifies accessibility guidelines to be considered when planning, developing and designing electrophotographic copying machines, page printers and multi-function devices. These guidelines are intended to improve accessibility required when primarily older persons, persons with disabilities and persons with temporary disabilities use office equipment.
Source: ISO


ISO 9241-20:2008 is intended for use by those responsible for planning, designing, developing, acquiring, and evaluating information/communication technology (ICT) equipment and services. It provides guidelines for improving the accessibility of ICT equipment and services such that they will have wider accessibility for use at work, in the home, and in mobile and public environments.


Mobile World Congress 2014 logo

Mobile is a catalyst of change and innovation. Mobile is creating the next connected device that transforms communication. Advancing the next payment system that alters commerce. Launching the next must-have app that changes how we interact.

Mobile World Congress is the blueprint for the NEXT big innovation. Whatever is coming NEXT will likely be born at Mobile World Congress 2014 – either announced on stage during our Conference programme, showcased in our award-winning Exhibition, or conceived during one of the thousands of meetings taking place during the week.


Pages

Subscribe to Information and communications technology