Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. Not all tumors are cancerous; benign tumors do not spread to other parts of the body. Possible signs and symptoms include a lump, abnormal bleeding, prolonged cough, unexplained weight loss and a change in bowel movements. While these symptoms may indicate cancer, they may have other causes. Over 100 cancers affect humans.

American Cancer Society

American Cancer Society logo

The American Cancer Society is a nationwide, community-based voluntary health organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem. Our Global Headquarters are located in Atlanta, Georgia, and we have regional and local offices throughout the country to ensure we have a presence in every community. Learn more about who we are, what we do, and our plans for the future by exploring the areas below.

Source: Corporate website

The Role of Esophagus in Voice Rehabilitation of Laryngectomees

The total laryngectomy is a standard procedure of laryngeal carcinoma treatment which leaves multiple persistent consequences on a laryngectomized person. After laryngectomy, all of patients cannot speak loudly, and 10–58% patients have a dysphagia. In such changed anatomical condition, the esophagus has a key function in two of three primary approaches to voice—speech rehabilitation of laryngectomized patients: esophageal and tracheoesophageal speech therapy method because one of these is the only acceptable solution of substitute alaryngeal speech.

Esophageal Cancer and Beyond

Human life relies on two basic supplies from nature: oxygen and food. Oxygen can be utilized directly, but food has to go through a process of digestion to become usable nutrients. The esophagus represents the beginning of this long journey. Because of its critical location, esophageal cancer is one of the deadliest malignancies in the world, and furthermore its incidence has been rising steadily year after year while other cancers are declining. It is predicted that by the year 2035 the esophageal cancer population will increase by 77.4% and become one of top global concerns.

My Voice

My Voice website image

Created by Itzhak Brook MD a physician and a laryngectomee. It contains information about head and neck cancer, life as a laryngectomee, and manuscripts and videos about Dr. Brook's personal experience as a patient with throat cancer. It has information about side effects of radiation and chemotherapy; methods of speaking; airway, mucus, stoma, voice prosthesis; eating and swallowing; medical, dental and psychological issues; respiration; anesthesia; and travelling.

Source: Corporate website

Voice restoration following head and neck surgery

The American Cancer Society estimated 59,000 cases of head and neck cancer in the United States in 2015 (American Cancer Society, 2015). Individuals with head and neck cancer acquire communication needs as a result of various cancer treatments, including surgical resection, radiation, and chemotherapy. Surgical treatments may involve resection of head/neck structures and tissue that may result in partial or complete removal of the larynx, vocal cords, and articulatory structures, in turn resulting in loss of voice and/or speech.

Voice restoration following head and neck surgery

The American Cancer Society estimated 59,000 cases of head and neck cancer in the United States in 2015 (American Cancer Society, 2015). Individuals with head and neck cancer acquire communication needs as a result of various cancer treatments, including surgical resection, radiation, and chemotherapy. Surgical treatments may involve resection of head/neck structures and tissue that may result in partial or complete removal of the larynx, vocal cords, and articulatory structures, in turn resulting in loss of voice and/or speech.

Handbook for Laryngectomy Patients

This book has been designed for the use of laryngectomy patients both preand post-operatively, their families and friends. It will also be of interest to student nurses and speech therapists.

It gives useful information on all aspects of laryngectomy from the initial diagnosis onward and can be used both prior to surgery and at any time following the operation as a reference document and for resource material.